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Thread: From novice to expert

  1. #1

    From novice to expert

    FROM NOVICE TO EXPERT

    We all start out as novices, in whatever field we choose to participate
    in, and there is no disgrace in being a novice. How and what we choose to
    learn determines to what level of "expert" we achieve and how fast we
    achieve it. Some people quickly find that they do not have the
    determination that it takes to "pay their dues" and to learn the lessons
    they have learned and they quickly drop out of the picture. Then there are
    those that spend countless years making the same mistakes over and over,
    never progressing past the novice stage. And lastly, there are those
    individuals whose knowledge and understanding of sport is awe inspiring,
    and can be called a true expert in the dogs.

    Most fanciers in the beginning, start by being attracted to one dog. That
    certain dog with the right look, the determined attitude, the
    awe-inspiring performance that compels you to find out more about the
    breed. I remember, my father, Ralph Greenwood, in those early years with
    the APBT. His main interest was as a conditioner and handler. He said many
    times that good dogs can be found in every bloodline, and it was his
    interest to find the best ones, whether they were in his yard or the yard
    of friends and bring them to compete at the proper weight and in the best
    condition possible. He didn't spend too much energy worrying about the
    dog's pedigree, or if the dog was the product of line breeding, inbreeding
    or an out-crossed breeding. He truusted the breeder from whom he got the
    dog, for the selection of the brood stock, the research into
    the bloodlines and the careful planning of the breedings.

    As Ralph moved down the path from Novice to Expert, his understanding of
    the dog game deepend and his focus broadened. It was in the late 1960's
    when I remember the focus changing to pedigrees, and what bloodlines our
    current dogs came from. My brother Hank, in his drafting class at the
    Junior High School made up blank six generation pedigree forms. Mom and I
    spent hours writing out six generation pedigrees by hand on all of our
    dogs and the dogs of our friends. Ralph's interest went further into the
    individual histories of the dogs in the pedigrees of his dogs and other
    good dogs that he had the opportunity to see. I remember the letters and
    phone calls to breeders and the treasured hand written comments scrawled
    on the pedigrees about a certain sire or dam, ie., "3x winner", "producer
    of 2 champions", "best 37 lb. male I ever saw", etc.. We soon learned that
    it was the history behind the dogs that made it so fascinating.

    Another excellent breeder, who may be called a true EXPERT in the dogs,
    was Howard Heinzl. During the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's, he produced some
    of the best APBT's in the western United States. Howard was not only a
    breeder of the APBT, but he was also interested in thoroughbred racing
    horses and their breeding. The summer I turned 16, I had the opportunity
    to spend a few weeks with Howard and his wife at his home in Tempe,
    Arizona. Every day, when the mid afternoon temperatures would force us
    inside, we would retreat to his 'study'. It was an air-conditioned back
    porch, where we would look over different pedigrees. We would look over
    pedigrees of famous race horses to see what breeding produced this horse
    or that horse. Howard would tell me that dog in the pedigree that we were
    studying. He would also tell me about upcoming breedings that he was
    planning and why the breeding should produce the type of dog he was
    hoping. He would also laugh at the end of his story to proclaim, "and with
    all this careful planning, rest assured it is in the lap of the Gods." It
    was from Howard that I gained respect for a dog's pedigree, as his disdain
    was evident for anyone suspected of falsifying the breeding of a dog or a
    horse. One of his famous sayings was, that a man who would falsify a
    pedigree would "steal the gold coins off of his dead mother's eyes".

    It is interesting to note that this saying refers to the death ritual in
    England during the Victorian era. The body of a dead relative was prepared
    and shrouded and displayed in the parlor of the family home for relatives
    and friends to visit and mourn. Gold coins were placed on top of the
    shroud in the eye region, to buy the dead relatives entrance into Heaven.
    Anyone who would steal the gold coins off of his own mothers eyes, had to
    be lower than low! Howard understood that breeding dogs is speculative
    enough, even when you do all of your homework, plan your breeding
    carefully and select quality brood stock. For a breeder to breed a dog
    with an unknown pedigree, it would be like going duck hunting
    blind-folded. I have known of breeders wasting ten years
    or more breeding a line of dogs, and coming up broke.

    When I get numerous e-mails and calls from fanciers inquiring "how do I
    get papers on this wonderful dog of unknown background, so I can breed
    him" I remind myself that these are NOVICES and in time, with education,
    rational counseling and experience, they can come to understand the
    importance of selection of quality dogs with excellent bloodlines, for
    ones breeding program. Without this criteria, there is no assurance
    of quality dogs for the future. And when I hear someone proclaiming,
    "the only thing that pedigree papers are good for is cleaning up puppy
    poop", I smile and remember the beginning, FROM NOVICE TO EXPERT !

    ADBA Gazette / Spring 2002
    By Amy (Greenwood) Burford, daughter of the late Ralph Greenwood.

    .
    .
    .

  2. #2

    Re: From novice to expert

    amazing. really inspiring
    Your dog will show you as much respect as you earn - no more, no less.
    http://www.nizmosk9supply.com/
    -Love what you do, and you'll never work another day in your life-

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    1,197

    Re: From novice to expert

    that was a very good article. thank you for sharing. gives one things to think about.
    Peanut SPD-B, JD, JD-B, JD-G,SRD, SRD-B, FF-B FF-S FF-G, DM
    splash dogs Top APBT 2013
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    Be the person your dog THINKS you are.

  4. #4

    Re: From novice to expert

    good stuff! :)

  5. #5

    Re: From novice to expert

    Always a good read in my opinion and with all the new members joining the forum lately I figured Iíd bump it back up to the top of the thread list to give those of you a chance to read it who havenít. Enjoy!

    Quote Originally Posted by CHATNJACK View Post
    FROM NOVICE TO EXPERT

    We all start out as novices, in whatever field we choose to participate
    in, and there is no disgrace in being a novice. How and what we choose to
    learn determines to what level of "expert" we achieve and how fast we
    achieve it. Some people quickly find that they do not have the
    determination that it takes to "pay their dues" and to learn the lessons
    they have learned and they quickly drop out of the picture. Then there are
    those that spend countless years making the same mistakes over and over,
    never progressing past the novice stage. And lastly, there are those
    individuals whose knowledge and understanding of sport is awe inspiring,
    and can be called a true expert in the dogs.

    Most fanciers in the beginning, start by being attracted to one dog. That
    certain dog with the right look, the determined attitude, the
    awe-inspiring performance that compels you to find out more about the
    breed. I remember, my father, Ralph Greenwood, in those early years with
    the APBT. His main interest was as a conditioner and handler. He said many
    times that good dogs can be found in every bloodline, and it was his
    interest to find the best ones, whether they were in his yard or the yard
    of friends and bring them to compete at the proper weight and in the best
    condition possible. He didn't spend too much energy worrying about the
    dog's pedigree, or if the dog was the product of line breeding, inbreeding
    or an out-crossed breeding. He truusted the breeder from whom he got the
    dog, for the selection of the brood stock, the research into
    the bloodlines and the careful planning of the breedings.

    As Ralph moved down the path from Novice to Expert, his understanding of
    the dog game deepend and his focus broadened. It was in the late 1960's
    when I remember the focus changing to pedigrees, and what bloodlines our
    current dogs came from. My brother Hank, in his drafting class at the
    Junior High School made up blank six generation pedigree forms. Mom and I
    spent hours writing out six generation pedigrees by hand on all of our
    dogs and the dogs of our friends. Ralph's interest went further into the
    individual histories of the dogs in the pedigrees of his dogs and other
    good dogs that he had the opportunity to see. I remember the letters and
    phone calls to breeders and the treasured hand written comments scrawled
    on the pedigrees about a certain sire or dam, ie., "3x winner", "producer
    of 2 champions", "best 37 lb. male I ever saw", etc.. We soon learned that
    it was the history behind the dogs that made it so fascinating.

    Another excellent breeder, who may be called a true EXPERT in the dogs,
    was Howard Heinzl. During the 1940's, 1950's, and 1960's, he produced some
    of the best APBT's in the western United States. Howard was not only a
    breeder of the APBT, but he was also interested in thoroughbred racing
    horses and their breeding. The summer I turned 16, I had the opportunity
    to spend a few weeks with Howard and his wife at his home in Tempe,
    Arizona. Every day, when the mid afternoon temperatures would force us
    inside, we would retreat to his 'study'. It was an air-conditioned back
    porch, where we would look over different pedigrees. We would look over
    pedigrees of famous race horses to see what breeding produced this horse
    or that horse. Howard would tell me that dog in the pedigree that we were
    studying. He would also tell me about upcoming breedings that he was
    planning and why the breeding should produce the type of dog he was
    hoping. He would also laugh at the end of his story to proclaim, "and with
    all this careful planning, rest assured it is in the lap of the Gods." It
    was from Howard that I gained respect for a dog's pedigree, as his disdain
    was evident for anyone suspected of falsifying the breeding of a dog or a
    horse. One of his famous sayings was, that a man who would falsify a
    pedigree would "steal the gold coins off of his dead mother's eyes".

    It is interesting to note that this saying refers to the death ritual in
    England during the Victorian era. The body of a dead relative was prepared
    and shrouded and displayed in the parlor of the family home for relatives
    and friends to visit and mourn. Gold coins were placed on top of the
    shroud in the eye region, to buy the dead relatives entrance into Heaven.
    Anyone who would steal the gold coins off of his own mothers eyes, had to
    be lower than low! Howard understood that breeding dogs is speculative
    enough, even when you do all of your homework, plan your breeding
    carefully and select quality brood stock. For a breeder to breed a dog
    with an unknown pedigree, it would be like going duck hunting
    blind-folded. I have known of breeders wasting ten years
    or more breeding a line of dogs, and coming up broke.

    When I get numerous e-mails and calls from fanciers inquiring "how do I
    get papers on this wonderful dog of unknown background, so I can breed
    him" I remind myself that these are NOVICES and in time, with education,
    rational counseling and experience, they can come to understand the
    importance of selection of quality dogs with excellent bloodlines, for
    ones breeding program. Without this criteria, there is no assurance
    of quality dogs for the future. And when I hear someone proclaiming,
    "the only thing that pedigree papers are good for is cleaning up puppy
    poop", I smile and remember the beginning, FROM NOVICE TO EXPERT !

    ADBA Gazette / Spring 2002
    By Amy (Greenwood) Burford, daughter of the late Ralph Greenwood.

    .
    .
    .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    I live in TEXAS!
    Posts
    769

    Re: From novice to expert

    That is awesome!

  7. #7

    Re: From novice to expert

    great article, makes me feel a little more secure about being a novice :)

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